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liberty mutual insurance. >> shepard: good afternoon. 5:00 in new york. 7:00 a.m. in tokyo, japan. i'm shepard smith and this is fox news continuing coverage of the aftermath, one of the largest earthquakes ever recorded, including new information about radiation levels near the country's nuclear power plant or inside one. and new reports of damage in the state of california. but first -- >> shepard: this was part of the scene in japan when the 8.9 magnitude quake struck in the middle of the afternoon. a quarter to 3:00 in the afternoon on friday. the quake is nearly 8,000 times stronger than the one which devastated new zealand weeks ago. hundreds of aftershocks across japan have followed. so did a towering tsunami. with walls of water as high as 30 feet. four complete trains are now missing along the coast, train services are now suspended across much of the nation, stranding millions of commuters in the japanese capital. a ship carrying 100 people was swept away. thousands of homes are destroyed. even an airport is under water. hundreds are reported dead. hundreds even thousand
't forget there are enormous numbers of earthquakes in japan. people are not completely terrified every time there is an earthquake. it happens a lot. it's just that this earthquake was one of the most powerful ones ever recorded. one of the interesting things when you get back to the nuclear power plants, thomas, is the nuclear power plants were designed to with stand earthquakes that were five times less powerful than the one that hit them. they weren't designed to sustain a tsunami at the same time. you have to ask was the planning correct here? that's easier in hindsight, but was it correct in terms of safety measures. >> bob, thank you very much. appreciate it. >>> the situation with japan's nuclear reactor brings to mind for a lot of people the 1986 chernobyl disaster in russia and 1979's three mile island disaster in pennsylvania. joining me on the phone is dick thornburg who was governor of pennsylvania during the three mile island crisis. what has been going through your head as you watch the events unfolding in japan and the talk and fear about the nuclear reactors there? >> there
has been evacuated. japan says the amount of radiation leaked is small. the u.s. navy is repositions away from the plant after low levels of radiation found on crew members who took place in a relief mission. correspondents are in place all over the nation. you will hear from them throughout the day. >>> a new explosion at an already damaged nuclear plant has japan and the world on edge. this is from the fukushima daiichi plant. we understand the fuel rods were exposed at reactor number two. that is dangerous. it could mean big problems down the road. according to the "new york times" the "uss ronald reagan" sailed into a radioactive cloud and crew members were exposed to low level radiation and had to be treated. now the "uss ronald reagan" is moving out to sea. here is stan grant and what he had to say about the threat of a nuclear crisis. >> we have been focusing on the one and three reactor at the daiichi plant. the number two cooler was knocked out. that is dangerous territory if the water level drops too quickly. as they did with one and three, they pumped sea water into reacto
for fitting us in. >>> and more on the disaster in japan straight ahead on "the daily rundown" with chuck and savannah, right now. >>> overnight, japan is reeling after the largest earthquake in its recorded history. it now pushes a tsunami across its shores and reports of several hundred are killed as the water sweeps away ships, vehicles, buildings, sparking fires, devastating coastal communities, and even threatening some nuclear plants over there. meanwhile, on this side of the pacific, waves are blanketing things, it's hitting hawaii this past hour and the west coast is now bracing for an impact later this morning. we have live reports. and we're going to hear from fema director right here ondale rundo daily rundown. >> let's get to the rundown. we will start with the breaking news out of japan. a catastrophic 8.9 earthquake in japan today. the largest earthquake in japan's recorded history. the latest death poll, the ap is reporting japanese police saying 200 to 300 bodies have been found in the northeastern coastal area. the quake sent tsunami waves barreling across the pacific, co
ever recorded. it sparked fires across japan, including the one you say. this is an oil refinery near tokyo. you have to worry about the flooding issue, a major problem in and around tokyo. there's still fires that are blazing out of control all over the place. tokyo, the surrounding states to it. i was watching on your broadcast some of the pictures. you had an airport that was up there. that was actually the airport that is a very, very new airport that was built, that's right on the ocean line there. that's why it was so devastated. >> we're showing the video that came into our newsroom a little while ago. you can see the pacific ocean in the background and the tsunami wave and this is mid wave, you can see if you're looking at h.d., screen left, part of the runway still not covered. don't exactly know where any of the airplanes are. maybe there was a bit of a warning. how long was the warning, tom, between the time the earthquake hit at 2:46 p.m. local time and it was an 8.9 magnitude. largest that started there in japan. how much warning between the earthquake hitting and the ts
:00 a.m. in japan, and hundreds of people are still missing. that massive quake hit the area just about 12:45 a.m. eastern time. sparking hundreds of aftershocks and a devastating tsunami a short time later. police in japan now say 200 to 300 bodies have been found in sendai, the city closest to the epicenter. these are the first moments of terror. buildings began to crumble, sending huge blocks of concrete tumbling to the streets. the most powerful earthquake in 140 years volted life to a frightening halt. epicenter, 81 miles off of japan's northeast coast, near sendai, home to around 1 million people. south of sendasendai, the ceili the airport crashed to the floor. tre tre tremors felt 230 miles away in tokyo, turning a meeting with japan's prime minister in the parliament building into chaos. the quake ignited fires that is made up of a chain of islands. a spectacular fire erupted in the chiba refinery east of tokyo. dependent on nuclear power, utility companies shut down reactors. thousands of residence were ordered to evacuate homes near a plant southwest of sendai, after its cool
. >>shepard: thank you very much. good morning from tokyo. it's 4:00 a.m. in the capital city in japan, 3 p.m. in new york city and the japanese people will awake as the sunrises in an hour and 45 minutes to learn that power outages will be rolling across this nation as they work to conserve fuel as 30 percent of all energy across japan comes from nuclear power and now there are great concerns of nuclear meltdown on the northeast coast a couple of hundred kilometers from where we are now. behind me is the rainbow bridge a fixture in tokyo. it is usually lit up in many colors and it is shut down as are the tops of skyscrapers as they work for voluntary energy conservation in the hopes that extra tokyo will not have to face the kind of black outs that could be necessary across this nation. high alert cross japan with nuclear concerns, thousands of people washing ashore, and many thousands still missing, and a disaster which the prime minister says here tokyo and the rest of the japan have not seen since world war ii. it began with an epic earthquake the most powerful earthquakes on record, th
'lin sana'a. rick: the president addressing the japan crisis during a news conference. >> i want to be very clear, we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether iting the west coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't
, good night, america. captioned by closed captioning services, inc >> bret: japan deals with environmental crisis following the earthquake and tsunami. will potential nuclear disaster there affect growing reliance for energy over here? and republican leaders try to keep the members in line long enough to avoid a government shutdown. live from the studio in washington, this is "special report." i'm bret baier. japan is coping with multiple disasters tonight. the japanese prime minister says if the catastrophe unseen since the end of world war ii. millions of people have little or no food, water, or heat in the freezing temperatures. following friday's earthquake and tsunami. nearly 1900 are confirmed dead but estimates for a final tally run much higher, with thousands more missing. explosions and exposed fuel rods at nuclear facilities heightened fear of full-scale meltdown. correspondent adam housley is in japan tonight. >> fears of a worst case scenario grip a nation that's shaken and battered from friday's 9.0 earthquake, subsequent tsunami and continual aftershocks. n
killed, but some fear the death toll -- >>> a massive and historic earthquake hits japan, and it is creating devastation across the country this morning. >> the pictures are just astounding. a massive wall of water pushing aside everything in its path. farmland flooded for miles, dragging along homes, cars, boats. these are some of the most stunning pictures as you see that wall of water just washing over farmland far inland from the coast of japan. good morning. this is special coverage this morning of "american morning" on this friday, march 11th. it's 5:00 a.m. on the east coast. 7:00 p.m. in tokyo. we're following breaking news in japan after an 8.9 magnitude quake hits and triggers a massive 13-foot tsunami. >> the rescue operation is under way right now, but also happening right now a lot of warnings are in place, tsunami warnings for at least 20 countries. and hawaii and the west coast of the u.s. under warnings as well. let me tell you about this quake. a devastating one, one of the most powerful earthquakes ever recorded. it was an 8.9 magnitude quake. it hit off
at a nuclear plant in japan grows my dire by the hour. tonight, the warning from the united states top nuclear chief. plus, the workers who stayed behind and put their lives on the line. i'm shepard smith live in tokyo. the news starts now. they fight their way through radiation and dodge explosions in the dark. risking their own lives for their country. the unseen heros who may be japan's last line of defense against an even bigger disaster. meanwhile, an emotional reunion for one quake survivor. but search crews also finding more victims. and one relief worker says the situation at the shelters is getting desperate. >> the stores are empty. nothing is getting through here. >> shepard: plus, an american who lived through the quake and tsunami finally gets word to her family. now, the battle to bring her home. most experts say the radiation will not reach the united states. lots of americans apparently are not listening. tonight the iodine rush and the reality check. good thursday morning from tokyo just past 8:00 a.m. where the situation is devolving quickly. there is now no water, according
noticeable, has yet to be seen. >> japan's east coast, hit with a 23-foot tsunami, shortly after the quake struck. police along the country's northeast coast, report finding the bodies of two to three hundred people, japan railways working to find a missing passenger train. while the government reports the giant wave swept away a ship, carrying about 100 people. >> unfortunately we expect to get more reports like those, 8.9 magnitude quake is japan's worst on record as we say, one of the worst in world history. and rocked cities hundreds of miles from epicenter an spawned dozens and dozens, as we hear it of aftershocks. >> look at one of japan's three nuke we're power plants, that are having some problems right now, the worst in the city of onahana where police ordered evacuations where a fire disabled a cooling system there. no reports of radiation leaking, secretary of state hillary clinton says the u.s. is sending coolant. >> there are fires as well, though, burning across the region with several major explosions, and japanese oil an chemical plants, you are looking at one over the oil
's happening in japan. >> thank you, mr. president. i have two question. on the tragedy in japan. so you already touched on the issue in your opening statement but i'd like to ask about your personal feeling on the situation. you went to japan last year. now, tsunami hit coast of japan and waves washed away cars and houses and japanese people are devastated. i just want to ask about your personal thoughts and feelings on that. and secondly, you also touched on assistance from the united states to japan. and japanese government said that the japan asked for help from u.s. forces in japan. are you willing to provide those assistance? >> the answer to your second question is, yes. i told prime minister kan we'll provide whatever assistance they need. my understanding is the main assistance to provide them is lift capacity. the ability for us to i think help in the cleanup. obviously, when you have a tsunami like this, as well as an earthquake, you have huge disruptions both in the infrastructure. you have boats and houses and cars that are washed in to main thoroughfares and any assistance
>>> disaster in japan. right now on "news nation" -- hundreds dead, hundreds more missing from the tsunami of mud and debris triggered by one of the strongest earthquakes in reported history. [ siren ] >> sirens of warning blaring in hawaii up and down west coast, communities evacuated for possibly hitting u.s. shores. >>> parts of california feeling the effect. boats on the coast are tossed around like toy. >>> hi, everybody, good to have you with me today. i'm thomas roberts. "news nation" following devastation from japan's 8.9 magnitude earthquake. right now, it's 4:00 in the morn in japan and people are trying to flee the hardest hit areas. the quake struck 80 miles off the northeast coast and felt all wait to beijing, china. as you can see, it sent people running into the streets in a frenzy, dodging debris falling from buildings. 4 million buildings without power in tokyo. but the quake wasn't the worst part. shortly after a violent tunisia crashed into the northeast coast, killing hundreds of people. waves washing away cars, roads, homes. aftershocks lasting for hours, c
.m. friday in japan. >> biggest one to date. oh my god. that is the biggest earthquake to date. it is still going. oh my god. the building's going to fall. >> magnitude 8.9. that's 8.9, the strongest earthquake ever in japan. then this. a massive wall of water. devastating tsunami. it swept ashore along japan's northeastern coast. surging well inland. sweeping away cars, boats, homes. almost anything in its path. hundreds of people are dead with no way to know just how high that death toll will rise. we will bring that back to you. that's the situation developing right now. we have a situation at a japanese nuclear plant, trying to cool down a reactor. the plant is called the fukishima plant. it suffered a quake-related problem with its cooling system. joining us is a professor of disaster management at the university of georgia. mr. delles, explain to us, the last we heard they're trying to release some of this radioactive steam to try to relieve some of the pressure. what will that do? >> well, what's happened is that about 11 reactors all the m ero went down, stopped on purpose due to gr
rises in quake ravaged japan as food and water show signs of nuclear contamination. >>> and staying connected, technology provide's lifeline for students trying to find loved ones in japan's disaster zone. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with russ mitchell. >> good evening. a second wave of u.s.-led air attacks against libya is under way tonight as b2 bombers from the first wave return to their base in missouri late tonight. on the ground, u.s. aircraft attack libyan forces south of benghazi for the first time while muammar qaddafi remained defiant, calling nations allied against him the party of satan and vowing to fight inch by inch for his country. we have correspondents on the ground in libya and in washington with the latest and we begin with national security correspondent david martin at the pentagon. >> an unmanned reconnaissance zone takes off from sicily to survey the damage done by american missiles and bombs. an overhead photo shows what happened to the battlefield. >> you can see the shelters, one of which we have blown up here that is actuall
, but how does it end? >>> in japan, the disaster deepens with new problems at the nuclear plant. there are new fears about food safety and an american family has received the worst possible news about their daughter. our teams are on the ground. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. in addition to two wars on two other fronts, the united states military tonight is engaged against libya. the attacks are in the form of air strikes. 32 of them in just the last 24 hours. about half now being carried out by u.s. aircraft. and there have been 136 cruise missiles launched. only eight of them by british armed forces. the rest launched by the u.s. they have hit targets up and down the libyan coastline, mostly aimed at libyan defenses, so the coalition aircraft can begin enforcing that no-fly zone over a larger portion of the country. the united states says moammar gadhafi is not a target personally, but president obama says the u.s. acted in these attacks he launched from south america to stop gadhafi from firing on his own people. we
york. the president is expected to make a statement about japan at 3:30 eastern time as japan grapples with a nuclear crisis and the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami there. the latest, the death toll stands at 5,429. nearly 10,000 people still missing. at the pufukushima nuclear plan desperate attempts to cool the reactor but these efforts are having limited impact. and the danger of radiation has delayed efforts to permanently restore water to the pumps to cool the reactor. power may not be up and rung until tomorrow at the earliest. the spnk giving military families the okay to leave major u.s. bases across japan. that order covers more than 40,000 people there. in addition, the u.s. is sending potassium iodide into the country in case people want to use it. and as a precaution, homeland secretary janet napolitano says all passengers and cargo from japan will now be screened for radiation in an abundance of caution. let's get to the white house briefing now. press secretary jay carney joined by gregory jaczko of the nuclear regulatory commission in this country. let's listen.
the united states will play... playy.. new radiation concerns in japan the foods that radioactive materials have been detected in ... ... weather open open "i dont know what ould ok." . im glad the kids are - a group of kids sick at school ...the substance they ate --- and who gave it to them... them... and a free surgery ---the controverssal operation these want... 3- a developing story out of libya tonight ----hello i'm the u-s and french militaries fired missiles into libya.it's an internatiinal mission folbaum reports ... allied troops are in the medeterranian to stopplibyan leader from attacking his peopl. peeple. -------------------------------- p------------------------------- -------------------------------- -------------------------------- --------the u-s -- taking part in an international military operation to prooect people in libba. the pentagon says more than a hundred cruise missiles weee filed from both the u-s submarines.... attacking thee libyyn air defense systems. statement during his visit to brazil. obama: "the us is acting ... ... libyan people." eerlier france l
said about army and wikileaks that led to his resignation. >> heather: but first, japan's worst crisis since world war ii, that is how they are describing the earthquake. at this hour, the death toll is in the thousands and exact number may never be known. a powerful quake and subs consequent tsunami. the government is working frantically to prevent nuclear meltdowns. greg palkot joins us live north of tokyo from the latest on the recovery efforts. >> reporter: that japanese prime minister went on to say it's going to take the determination of people like the folks in these coastal town in northeastern japan and people throughout the region to deal with the situation. they are getting hit on all fronts. as you noted there is a nuclear catastrophe up the coast from where we are. today we saw another nuclear reactor stricken by the earthquake that hit here on friday. sea water had to be poured into the reactor to cool it down to avoid a full scale meltdown. still evacuation of the region around this nuclear reactor complex continues and the screening for radiation poisoning also continue
earthquake of historic proportions. you're seeing pictures from inside parliament in japan. and you see the shaking going on. but we have a two-prong disaster. it's not just the massive earthquake that's def tvastatin the country right now. >> that's right, the pictures are astounding. this massive wall of water pushing everything aside in its path. look at these cars. you see them bobbing up and down. and this is about 60 miles north of tokyo, northeast in a farming area. and this incredible tsunami wave just rolling through taking everything in its path, farmland flooded for miles dragging along homes, cars, and boats. and we have all of this covered this morning. we're getting new details by the minute on this special edition of "american morning." thanks for being with us. it's friday, march 11th. i'm kiran chetry. >> i'm t.j. holmes. it's 8:00 right now in tokyo with a massive rescue effort is underway right now. again, we told you this is a two-prong disaster. there was the initial 8.9 magnitude quake. that is a historic earthquake. one of the fifth largest since 1900. one of the
, because obviously, we are concerned about what is happening in japan. >> thank you, i'm with a japanese newspaper. i have two questions on the tragedy in japan. so you already touched on the issue in your opening statement, but i would like to ask about your personal feeling on the situation. you went to japan last year, and you went there, and now the tsunami off of the coast of japan and the waves washed away cars and houses and japanese people are devastated. i want to ask about your personal thoughts and feelings on that. secondly, you also touched on possible assistance from the united states to japan, and japanese government publicly said that japan asked for help from u.s. forces in japan. are you waiting to provide those assistance? >> the answer to the second question is yes. i told prime minister kan that we will provide whatever assistance they need. my understanding is that the main assistance that we will provide them is lift capacity. the ability for us to help in the cleanup. obviously, when you have a tsunami like this, as well as an earthquake, you have huge disruptions
in japan and beyond as a nation in i sis is forced to make very tough decisions. the battle for libya intensifying as rebels take a beating and government forces engage in nonstop shelling. will benghazi fall to moammar gadhafi. they are criticizing the president on not responding to issues at home and a broad. its all on "happening now." a good wednesday to you. i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. we are here in the fox newsroom and happening right now as jon just mentioned brand-new developments in the nuclear crisis that is gripping japan and company company taourg all of our attention. emergency workers who have have now dubbed the fukushima 50 risking their lives to prevent further disaster. this after another fir fire has broken out at the nuke plant. radiation is 300 times normal. jon: the numbers today are staggering, millions across japan struggling with very little food and water. nearly half a million people there are homeless now, and some 3700 listed as dead, but that number sure will he will rise with ten thousand people still missing in one northeastern city alone. mar
>> mitchell: tonight, disaster in japan. the death toll soars as rescuers struggle to get water, food and power to the survivors of friday's massive earthquake and devastating tsunami. i'm russ mitchell. also tonight, nuclear fears. as quake damaged reactors threaten to overheat, workers are struggling to contain the threat of multiple meltdowns. flooding across large parts of the u.s. force some residents out of their homes and on to higher ground. and pushed out. the state department spokesman quits after causing the treatment of the suspected wikileaks leaker ridiculous. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with russ mitchell. >> mitchell: and good evening. we are getting a clearer picture of the death and devastation in japan caused by friday's massive earthquake and tsunami. here's the latest. japan has now upgraded the quake to a magnitude 9. more than 1400 people are confirmed dead, with fears the toll could surge past 10,000. authorities say there is a risk of another nuclear reactor explosion, but u.s. officials say there is no radiation threat to
>>> we've been showing you all kinds of destruction in japan. that's a little shaking, mud-spattered cocker span yell in the sendai area. he watched over his injured friend since the tsunami destroyed his home. rescue crews took both dogs to a vet for treatment. >>> candy crowley is anchors "the situation room." >>> now, breaking news. urgent new teams to cool down an overheated reactor. now the u.s. government is stepping in to evacuate possibly thousands of americans from the country and get them away from any nuclear danger. secretary of state hillary clinton tells our wolf blitzer she's worried about the health and saved of americans in japan even as she heads home from tunis tunisia. i'm candy crowley, you're in "the situation room." nuclear experts say the new attempt to douse an overheated reactor has been somewhat effective. helicopters, fire trucks and police water cannons all have been deployed. we are told that radiation levels dipped, but they are still high, so the frarchtic work to prevent a full-scale meltdown goes on. cnn's anna coren is nil tokyo. just brin
can understand that we are in the middle here in japan of what appears to be an escalating nuclear crisis and so they continue to have these rolling blackouts. we saw some power going back on behind me there at the tokyo tower, but understand that this area alone has 45 million people requiring power so they're trying to conserve as much as they can. because a quarter of the power here has been affected by the devastating earthquake and tsunami. now, you also mentioned the rescuers, the americans who were contaminated. they are pouring in rescuers from literally all around the world, at least ten different nations. they've deployed 100,000 military here in japan, and we have seen them coming in at the airport. the sad fact of the matter is that these search and rescue teams will find little to rescue, although there were a couple of amazing stories today. a baby and an elderly man pulled from the rubble after spending three nights in it. but, for the most part, what they are finding is this tremendous devastation. in one town alone, an estimated 1,000 people who were washed away in
from the people of japan? the special comment coming up. >>> it's hard to believe, but with each passing hour the situation in japan is becoming more dire and dangerous. and today, this. another explosion rips through a nuclear containment building and this, the safety system at a third nuclear reactor within the stricken fukushima plant breaking down. the reactor's fuel rods exposed for more than two hours. and officials seem unable to determine just how much water remains, as they seek to prevent a full-scale meltdown. beyond the dangers surrounding nuclear plant, there's widespread suffering from sendai to tokyo. millions are facing a mull tide of challenge. officials struggling to balance rescue efforts to reach survivors, distribute aid and bury the dead. a thousand bodies washed ashore in the last few hours. search and rescue teams from some 13 countries have now converged on what will be a lengthy and complex operation. frantically working to find any survivors from the upgraded 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami. in all, nearly 10,000 people have been rescued, while ten
for help finding her sister who is a former english teacher in japan who returned to that country the day of the quake. ann found her and helped her reach her sister. >> do you have my sister? >> i have your sister. here she is. >> she is on the phone. are you okay? >> hi. >> are you okay? >> yeah. i'm totally okay. >> let's go right to tokyo now and msnbc's ciz jansing is there live. what's the primary concern now for people across the country? >> reporter: well, i think it's threefold. you have a humanitarian. you have an economic and you have an escalating nuclear crisis. there is nothing simple about what's happening here. and it is affecting not just that northeastern coastal area but really the entire country in a very profound way. now, let's start with the humanitarian crisis. you've been showing those pictures. they are absolutely heartbreaking, devastating. the one town that you showed in miyagi province where as many as a thousand people we heard earlier today washed up on the shore that had been bodies carried away in the tsunami. now officials there are saying they may have a
. the american-led bombing of libya. and the nuclear crisis in japan. one major question about the assault on libya, what happened to the media's skepticism? u.s. war planes hitting targets in libya for a second day today and i have to say this at the outset. the media get excited by war, the journalistic insulin starts pumping as we talk about cruise missiles and put up the maps and have retired generals on and sometimes something is lost, reminds me of eight years ago when shock and awe was reigned down upon baghdad and the media failed to ask questions. i looked at my "new york times" this morning and looked at my "washington post" and didn't see any editorials about the no-fly position. to newspapers don't see the excepty cal questions. what are if they are american casualties? do you stop this operation with gadhafi still in power? these are the questions we need to be asking. to help us answer them. rome hartman, former executive producer of the cbs news. and jamie mcentear, founder of the line of departure blog and former correspondent for cnn. where are the skeptical questions? >>
'm harry smith. also tonight, one week after japan's earthquake and tsunami a big break for the engineers trying to prevent a nuclear meltdown. and kids from around america and haiti, too, do what they can to help the people of japan. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> smith: good evening, katie is on assignment. president obama delivered a warning today to libyan dictator moammar qaddafi: stop slaughtering your people or face military action. the united states will help enforce a no-fly zone approved last night by the u.n. security council, but no american ground troops will be sent to libya. french and british warplanes could be in the air over libya by tomorrow. hours after the u.n. resolution passed, the qaddafi regime declared a cease-fire, but his forces reportedly kept shelling two cities-- misurata and ajdabiya. and there are also reports that qaddafi's forces are headed toward benghazi, the rebels' capital. david martin at the pentagon begins our coverage. david, good evening. >> reporter:
. >>> overwhelmed. rescuers fight aftershocks as they dig for survivors, but the japan death toll is soaring. millions now are facing a fourth night without water, food or heat. and now a radiation alert, a second hydrogen explosion rocks the stricken nuclear plant. japanese official its screen evacuees for radiation, and the u.s. has had to move warships back. >>> meanwhile meltdown fears. a third reactor is losing its cooling capacity. officials say even under the best scenario, this isn't going to end any time soon. it's monday, march 14th, 2011. i'm chuck todd. savannah is on assignment. >>> also this morning, libya, gadhafi's troops tighten their grip renewing calls for a no-fly zone from some rebels. we'll talk to the pentagon's press secretary on the latest on that. >>> then there's politics. another short-term budget deal. 2012ers are target to act more like candidates and the sound bite now heard around the country. let's get to the rundown and we're going to start in japan and the latest on the tragedy there. the prime minister is calling it the country's worst crisis since world w
in chile the president travels to el salvador. >>> to japan now. this morning workers are evacuated, or were evacuated from the tsunami stricken fukushima daiichi nuclear plant and smoke was seen rising from one of the reactors. there's been a dramatic jump in the estimated death toll from that massive earthquake and tsunami eleven days ago. police now estimate more than 18,000 people were killed. charlie d'agata has the story. >> reporter: beneath this pile of rubble a much-needed sign of hope. crews pulled an 80-year-old woman and her teenage grandson out alive, nine days after japan's earthquake and tsunami destroyed their home. reports say the two had been trapped in their kitchen, and survived by eating yogurt and other food found in the refrigerator. the dramatic rescue provided a rare bit of good news for a nation reeling from its worst disaster since world war ii. positive developments also emerged from the fukushima nuclear power plant, where engineers are racing to prevent a full-blown meltdown. two of the facility's six reactors are now under control. and crews plan to so
to start leaving japan, they can. >> wolf blitzer traveling with the secretary of state, thank you so much. we know that american companies have already started doing this, getting their employees out, moving their employees and their families in some cases and people who have been working in tokyo, now working in other cities further south, getting their families out of the country. we know companies have started doing this. >> many in the airport trying to get out. that does it for us. >> "cnn newsroom" with carol costello starts right now. >> happy st. patrick's day day to you guys, too. 9:00 a.m. on the east coast and 6:00 a.m. on the west. helicopters and fire trucks move in and pour water on an overheating reactor site. the latest desperate attempt to reduce radiation levels at the damaged nuclear plant and, so far, it appears to be failing. >>> the u.s. begins vaticevacua families of diplomatic staff and help other americans get out of the area as well. >>> in the meantime, the death toll from the earthquake and tsunami is rising yet again. the latest numbers, more than 5,400 people
of the region. but first, we turn to japan. where emergency workers are feverishly trying to cool down overheating fuel rods at the earthquake and tsunami-stricken nuclear plant. a u.n. nuclear official says the situation is "very serious." but appears to be stable. for now. the u.s. authorized the first evacuations of americans out of japan and president obama says he has asked for a comprehensive review of u.s. nuclear plant safety. correspondent greg palkot is in japan with the latest. >> reporter: there were desperate measures thursday in the fukushima nuclear plant in northeastern japan. helicopters doused water on overheating reactors to avoid a catastrophic core meltdown. the facility was sprayed down with more water from fire trucks. while authorities say there is some stabilization, they admit the method had little effect in reducing temperatures at the plant. others say even if a power line reaches coolant pumps they might not work. >> this is a very severe situation. we need to keep coolings at the fuel so that it doesn't reach criticality. >> reporter: all of the uncertaint
of northern japan, a stunning rescue to tell you about. >>> and later, how the nuclear nightmare in japan is sparking new worries about a long-controversial nuclear plant here in the u.s. >>> we're back now with the latest on the disaster in japan. nine days after the earthquake and tsunami, the death toll is nearly 8,500 and there are still nearly 13,000 people listed as missing. both numbers are expected to go even higher. and today we learned an incredible story of survival. an 80-year-old woman and her grandson were found alive in the wreckage of her home. they had been living on yogurt and water in the kitchen on the second floor. their rescue is giving new hope to those still searching for their loved ones. tonight, our ian williams reports from miyako, japan, one of the many devastated towns where the search is still going on. >> reporter: today, we reached miyako, or at least what's left of this once bustling fishing town. hundreds died here. soldiers were continuing to scour the rubble. turning over the battered shell of a car in search of bodies. this officer told me they had st
. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, another setback in japan. workers again forced to evacuate as smoke pours from crippled nuclear reactors and concerns grow about the safety of japan's food supply. and another a.t.f. agent tells cbs news the agency encouraged gun dealers in this country to sell weapons to mexican drug cartels. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. for a third straight night, tripoli has come under attack from u.s. and allied forces as they establish a no-fly zone over libya. anti-aircraft fire lit up the sky as moammar qaddafi's army tried to defend against the attack. rebels solidified their control in benghazi and launch and offensive to retake other cities. president obama said today the u.s. will turn over leadership of the operation to other nations within days. the president and british prime minister david cameron said qaddafi must go though they insisted he is not a target of the attacks. but a cruise missile attack last night may h
of people in japan and around the world that does not. >> with factories, ports, roads and railways shut down, many auto and technology companies are cut off from their suppliers in the disaster zone. that could be a shortage of auto parts and even some vehicles made in japan. >> we have been talking to local japanese car dealerships all day and the story is largely the same. their supply of cars is ok, but the rest of the year largely depends on how bad the crisis in japan gets. nissan, toyota, honda and beyond -- japanese car competitors with the same worried -- supply. the tsunami aftermath has altered supply at many of the plants these dealerships to live on for some popular -- rely on for some popular models. one japanese plant was wiped out. most hybrid models are made in japan, so that supply could be heard as well, especially if you multiplied the demand for prices. >> you are looking at that point rehab to order them and wait for several months to come in. >> the majority of these cars are made at u.s. plants, but even those are cutting back on production due to the fears the pa
, candy. good evening, everyone. tonight major breaking news in two important global dramas. japan uses helicopters and water cannons in a desperate effort to cool fuel. and tonight there's word a new power line has been brought to the fukushima daiichi complex, but as friday dawns in asia, no sign of a major breakthrough and growing worries of two of the six reactors still in distress. >>> and first a major but belated commitment to stop the brutal march of gadhafi in libya. they voted to authorize not only a no-fly zone over libya, but also all necessary measures including military force to stop the government and mercenaries from slaughtering civilians. i'm told the pentagon and nato partners have contingencies that include air strikes to punish military units, leaving gadhafi's push on his strongholds in the east. now that the u.n. authorized sfors, the strikes could be carried out within hours if the president and his partners around the world issue the orders. cnn's richard roth track ad dramatic vote at the the united nations tonight. richards? >> john, u.s. ambassador to the u.n
't believe the velocity of the huge stories. first and foremost in japan. >> we start with the latest on the devistration in japan. there is another major exexplosion in fukushima, wrap jap. water levels are far enough allow to partially showing the rods. sparking fears of another melt down. >> and bodies have been found in mlyangi. >> stock tock closed down over there six percent. >> u.s. naval forces are moving away from japan over fears of troops exposed to dangerous radiation particularly on the uss regan. >> rescue relief remains top priority but thousands of people are evacuated near the fukushima nuclear plant. if you look at it. second hydrogen explosion to rock the plant and the massive cloud of smoke is carrying radioactive conitalination and that is a concern for the u.s. naval ship providing humanitarian assistance. that affects uss ronald reagan a hundred miles from the plant. they detected low levels of radiation and prompted the ship to move further out to sea. in fact, the commander of the fleet. vice admiral, reveals that the ships are being temporarily repositioned a
in libya, across the middle east and japan. wolf in washington. two. happening right now, breaking news. president barack obama warns libyan troops and moammar gadhafi to stop attacks against civilians or face military action. how far will the u.s. and its allies go to enforce a u.n.-authorized no-fly zone? also this hour, a new level of crisis at japan's crippled snuk power plant. as the race goes on to heat down those reactors, officials now say this disaster is on par with the worst nuclear accident in u.s. history and mile after mile of destruction, search and rescue crews barely know where to begin. we're with emergency teams risking their own lives to save others. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> president obama says the world has given moammar gadhafi ample warning that his bloody assault on rebel forces will not stand. mr. obama putting gadhafi on notice just a while ago, a day after the u.n. security council approved the use of force to protect civilians in libya. the president says the libyan leader would commit atrocities if left unchecked and thousands o
are anxious to get out of japan amid fears of radiation exposure from those damage plant spirit >> mark: bay area what they are saying about radiation making it to our shores. >> james: we are watching the weather storm trucker for showing you light shower activity primarily in the south bay. a closer look at that and one to expect the next big storm. >> erica: alive look 101 those taillights toward santa clara traffic is moving well here but i have a fresh hot spot to tell you about straight ahead. >> darya: good morning and thank you for watching the kron 4 morning news at 7:00 a.m.. >> mark: the latest developments coming out of japan. new video of the reactors after a series of explosions and fires. the team that has been looking on the reactor continuing their work this morning. we are showing you the latest this morning. more smoke rising from the plant this morning. they had no choice to pull back when radiation levels were too high. one of the containment buildings is leaking radiation material into the air. the plant sustained at least two fires in four explosions. they are pumping
nations takes brand new action. and here in japan the desperate effort to cool the nuclear contractor. an extension cord more than half a mile long could provide the best chance yet of prevent ago nuclear breakdown. this is breaking news now on fox news channel, i'm shepard smith. the news starts now. >> shepard: they are attacking the problem from the air and the ground. part of the effort to cool down those fuel rods and reactors. >> even as japanese responders continue to do heroic work, we know that the damage to the nuclear reactors poses a substantial risk. >> shepard: and officials say what happens in the hours ahead is absolutely critical. plus, a new move to pull americans out of the danger zone. >> i'm concerned because i really don't know the situation about the radiation. >> shepard: tonight, the escape from japan. and good friday morning from tokyo where there is breaking news at the fukushima nuclear plant. multiple reports now indicate crews have successfully hooked up an emergency power cable to one of the plant's reactors. they have call it unit 2. we are waiting for
and strong allies in japan, as they've come to terms and wrestled with this challenging situation. most of you know that our equipment that we sent over to support them has arrived on a c-17. we sent a team of 33 additional people which were in addition to the six people we already had out there in japan. they had over 17,000 pounds of equipment with them. they've unpacked that. they've taken the two pods that do the aerial measurement of ground depositions and mounted them, one on a fixed-wing aircraft and one on a helicopter and we flew those aircraft on their first missions. we've been collecting information as they've come back. we're in the process of sharing that information with our japanese hosts and while that's still being looked at, preliminary indications are that they're consistent with the recommendations that came down from the nuclear regulatory commission. so indications are, it looks like the 50-mile evacuation was prudent. other countries around the world continue to do what they can do support the japanese as they lead this effort to address this challenge. we've had
from tide. >>> a busy three hours. following the latest developments out of japan and libya and that will continue. see you on monday. have a great weekend. >> "cnn newsroom" with carol costello starts right now. >> thank you. 9:00 a.m. on the east coast and 6:00 a.m. on the west and i'm carol costello sitting in for kyra phillips. >>> two huge stories echoing around the world. in japan new developments in the nuclear crisis and a new measure how dangerous the situation is. >>> in libya the world takes action against a dictator and the fear he could slaughter his own people. we are looking at the no-fly zone, the united states role in that and the military strikes that could begin at any time. >>> there are quickly developing events in the libyan civil war. libya's foreign minister has just announced an immediate cease-fire. the move comes after the u.n. security council approved a no-fly zone and that cleared the way for possible military action against moammar gadhafi's regime. a french official today said strikes will take place swiftly. the mood in the rebel held city of
on the disaster in japan. ten days after those nuclear reactors were damaged by the earthquake and tsunami, a new setback today in the recovery operation. workers were forced again to evacuate when smoke was spotted coming from two of the reactors. the official death toll from the disaster now totals 8,800, nearly 13,000 are still missing. now there are concerns about radiation in japanese pots and in sea water near the plant. bill whitaker has the latest including details about the plant's spotty safety record. >> reporter: it's a sign this crisis is far from under control. ten days after the fukushima plant was knocked out by japan's massive earthquake and tsunami and once again reactor three is spewing smoke a few hours later white smoke from reactor two. it's a mysterious and serious setback, one that prompted workers to evacuate and once again stopped efforts to stabilize the plant. over the weekend, there had been some encouraging signs. plant operators had reconnected electric cables to all six reactors for the first time since the crisis began. and after days of firefighters dousing react
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